Academic Course Offerings

The Michael Berry Career Center offers the following courses to meet the graduation requirements of the Michigan Merit Curriculum. Individual Course Descriptions below.

  • US History (10th Grade Social Studies)
  • US Economics / US Government (11th Grade Social Studies)
  • Language Arts 7/8 (12th Grade Language Arts)
  • AP Microeconomics / AP Macro Economics (Social Studies Elective)
  • Anatomy & Physiology (Science Elective offered through DCMST)
  • Forensic Science (Science Elective offered through DCMST)
  • AP Statistics (Math Elective offered through DCMST)
  • CoOp and Dual Enrollment are available at MBCC

MBCC Courses can fulfil a variety of requirements of the Michigan Merit Curriculum including:

  • Visuall, Performing and Applied Arts (VPAA – aka “Art”) All MBCC CTE Classes are approved for this credit).
  • Third year of science (must complete any MBCC CTE program sequence – all required classes).
  • Second year of world language (must complete a second year of any MBCC program)
  • Computer Applications (Software Specialist, Design Concepts and Business Tech & Management)
  • Senior Math (Accounting Classes)
  • Health (Allied Health – full year)
  • See document below for complete list and requirements

Academic Course Descriptions

ACCOUNTING 1 (Senior Math Elective)

In this one-semester, one-hour block course students will analyze, classify, and record business transactions for a service business using the double-entry accounting system in a manual and computerized setting. Emphasis is placed on applying general accounting procedures, utilization of the accounting equation, preparing bank and petty cash reconciliations, journalizing adjusting and closing entries, and completion of the accounting cycle. Coverage includes the recording of basic transactions and adjustments for service businesses. Students may participate in Business Professionals of America (BPA) or Distributive Education Clubs of America (DECA) Competitions. Course may count as a math course if taken during senior year.


ACCOUNTING 2 (Senior Math Elective)

In this one-semester, one-hour block course students will analyze, classify, and record business transactions for a merchandising business using special journals in a manual and computerized setting. Emphasis is placed on preparation of payroll records, accounting for payroll and payroll taxes, accounting for uncollectible accounts, preparation of adjusting entries, closing entries, and financial statements for a merchandising business. Students may participate in Business Professionals of America (BPA) or Distributive Education Clubs of America (DECA) Competitions. Course may count as a math course if taken during senior year (Prerequisite: Accounting 1)


ACCOUNTING 3 (Senior Math Elective)

In this is one-semester, one-hour block course students will review basic financial accounting principles covering the accounting cycle. Topics include: cash, investments, receivables and payables, inventory valuation, fixed and intangible assets valuation, current and long term liabilities, and owner’s equity. Internal control and financial statement analysis is also considered. Emphasis is placed on the corporate form of ownership. Students will also complete an accounting simulation to reinforce the covered material. Students may participate in Business Professionals of America (BPA) or Distributive Education Clubs of America (DECA) Competitions. Course may count as a math course if taken during senior year. (Prerequisites: Accounting 1, 2)


ACCOUNTING 4 (Senior Math Elective)

This is a one-semester, one-hour block course places emphasis on the preparation, analysis, and interpretation of financial statements, the treatment of tangible and intangible assets,accounting for accruals and deferrals, and financing options for acquiring capital for growth and development are explored. Various supplemental accounting projects involving the use of spreadsheets will be assigned. Students may participate in Business Professionals of America (BPA) or Distributive Education Clubs of America (DECA) Competitions. Course may count as a math course if taken during senior year (Prerequisite: Accounting 1, 2, 3)

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (Science Elective Offered through DCMST)

Anatomy and Physiology is a laboratory-based course that investigates the structure and function of the human body. Topics covered will include the basic organization of the body and major body systems (integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, digestive, and reproductive). The impact of aging and diseases on body systems will also be studied. The full-year course culminates with the dissection of a fetal pig.

AP MACROECONOMICS (Social Studies Elective)

AP Macroeconomics is an introductory college-level course that focuses on the principles that apply to an economic system as a whole. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination; it also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts


AP MICROECONOMICS (Social Studies Elective)

AP Microeconomics is an introductory college-level course that focuses on the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual economic decision-makers. The course also develops students’ familiarity with the operation of product and factor markets, distributions of income, market failure, and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts

FORENSIC SCIENCE (Science Elective Offered through DCMST)

Forensic Science is a one-semester integrated science course covering topics in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. In this course, we will focus on forensic techniques used by scientists and law enforcement officials to observe, collect, and analyze data that may be used to solve a crime. Topics of study include fingerprints, DNA, blood, etc. Students will analyze a mock crime scene by gathering and collecting evidence in order to solve the crime. Additionally, students will learn what is and isn’t possible through critical analysis of forensic techniques utilized in current TV shows.

LANGUAGE ARTS 7, 8 (12th Grade Language Arts Requirement)

This required 12th grade course is a comprehensive study of English/World literature from the Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, Restoration and Romantic Periods to the beginning of the eighteenth century. Students will read various genres inclusive of drama, morality play, epic, poetry, essays and correlate the historic, social and cultural significance of the literature to the events, people, philosophy, rhetoric and ethos of the time period. Students will be required to write personal reflective, persuasive, synthesis, comparison/contrast and evaluative responses to the readings as well as commit investigative research with focus on critical examination, logical thought development and the necessary use of textual support of ideas. The course will emphasize the universality of cultural/social/interpersonal themes as they apply to today’s world through investigative reading, discussion, research and writing.

U.S. ECONOMICS (11th Grade Social Studies Requirement, Fall Semester Only)

Students will learn about the structure, function, principles, and problems of the American economy. Fundamental concepts of both macroeconomics and microeconomics will be introduced. A study of the nature of economics and the basic economic problem will form the basis for a systematic analysis of supply and demand, the factors of production, economic instability, the forms of business organization, labor relations, and the effect of government regulation. Special emphasis will be given to the role of government in the American economic system and the use of monetary and fiscal policies to achieve economic stability. Students will have the opportunity to use their substantive knowledge and social science skills to critically examine current economic problems.


U.S. GOVERNMENT (11th Grade Social Studies Requirement, Spring Semester Only)

This is a one semester course describing the forms and functions of national, state and local governments in the United States. In this course, students will learn about the structure, principles, and ideals of the American system of government. An understanding of comparative political systems and the fundamental principles of American government will form the basis for a detailed analysis of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of the federal government. Special emphasis will be given to a critical study of the Constitution and fundamental civil liberties in the Bill of Rights. Students will have the opportunity to use their substantive knowledge and social science skills to critically examine current public policy issues. The student will be able to compare and contrast our system of government with other major political systems in the world today. Students will learn the importance of individual participation in our democratic society.


U.S. HISTORY and GEOGRAPHY 1, 2 (10th Grade Social Studies Requirement)

First semester’s course is a survey of American History from 1865 to 1920. Areas of study include the Reconstruction period, the westward movement, the industrial era, the growth of organized labor, political reform, the Progressive era, the impact of immigration, the growth of cities, the Spanish-American War, and the role of the United States in World War I. A topical approach is used to explore political, economic, social, and cultural developments. The influence of geography on historical events is also analyzed. Students will increase their knowledge of historical events and deepen their understanding of our American heritage.

Second semester’s course is a survey of American history from 1920 to the present. Areas of study include the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression, the New Deal, the role of the United States in World War II, the Cold War, the Korean War, the changing lifestyles of the 1950’s, political and social leaders in the 1960’s, the Vietnam War, and the domestic and international challenges faced by the United States during the 1970’s and 1980’s. A topical approach is used to explore political, economic, social, and cultural developments. The influence of geography on historical events is also analyzed. Students will learn how the mistakes and triumphs of America’s past shape our perceptions of current problems and our vision for America’s future.